Painting Interior Brick Wall Ideas

Painting Interior Brick Wall Ideas
Successful trompe I'oeil painting requires a substantial level of skill, but the finished result is worth the work. You a expand a small space or contract a large one, you can even create an Aegean view in the middle of a city, with views o islands across the bay – the stuff of daydreams, the perfect setting for a cosy armchair and a good post.
Squaring up
1 Copy the desired image onto tracing paper, simplifying 2 Draw another grid on the wall, and sketch in the mait for clarity, and then draw a grid of squares over it. Lines of the design as a painting guide, square bysquar
Fake tiles
1 Create a wall of 'tiles' with a small roller.

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Work in horizontal rows; uneven edges add to the handmade effect.
2 Vertical bands of diamond-shaped tiles are equally quick and simple; use a small roller held diagonally.
It is worth remembering to prepare your wall with a base coat of paint before you transfer your design.

Then copy the traced design closely onto the wall in pen or soft pencil, using the grid to guide you. Work square by square; it may help to look at each square as a series of abstract lines, rather than as part of the whole scheme; you can always soften up the junctions between the squares once you have copied all of them. It may help also to fix the traced design onto the wall using masking tape as a constant reference; you should always stand back and take stock as you work.

Do not pay too much attention to detail at this stage as you only want a sketched guide. If you define everything too rigidly, you will find it very difficult to paint freely and this will most likely result in a stiff, lifeless design. Once your sketch exists, start painting and be bold!
If you are not confident about your technique with a paintbrush, do not struggle with an ambitious project in the vain hope of producing a masterpiece.

Try decoupage to recreate decorative plasterwork rather than trying to reproduce a Renaissance frieze freehand. If you have access to a photocopier and your desired motif is reasonably small-scale, it is obviously very easy to enlarge or shrink a design mechanically, and to repeat a motif for a border. Or mock up panels using stone-effect paper, antiquing it with a tinted glaze.
In a kitchen or bathroom, it might be more appropriate to think simple, and to use a small radiator roller to create a quick and effective tile effect.

Load the roller evenly and paint rows of tiles either horizontally or as diamonds leaving a ‘grout’ space between each ‘tile’ for a more realistic look.
4 Trompe I'oeil can be as elaborate as the sea view'deft) or as simple as a couple of runs of tiles, here. It is important that you match your aspirations to your level of skill, but almost anyone could have a stab at this effect.

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